Nemo Kunai 2P Mountaineering Tent Review

Bottom Line:

A versatile, innovative and aesthethic tent that is light weight while still holding onto all the features you’d expect in a true 2-person, 4 season tent that will see you through the heat of Summer into the depths of a snowy Winter.

Looking at the vestibule on the Kunai 2P tent

Looking at the vestibule on the Kunai 2P tent

First Impressions and Observations:

As soon as I held the Nemo Kunai 2P tent in my hands my first thought was: “Yes! A tent that finally comes in a truly usable stuff sack”. I’m not going to lie, the stuff sacks that come with most tents usual disappoint me. Most times they are nothing more than a basic sack with a draw string to close them at the top.

Nemo has provided, as standard, with the Kunai 2P tent a stuff sack that is not only waterproof, but allows for airspace to be compressed out and it has a glow in the dark map of popular constellations on the inside! Tent manufacturers take note, this is how you impress a camper before they’ve even had a chance to actually look at the tent.

Pitching the Kunai 2P Mountaineering tent is extremely straightforward also. It has two main poles that cross over the main tent body and then an additional brow pole to increase head room at the tent door and provide extra height to the vestibule.

Fully sealed up inside this tent gets warm fast! I can see how the double walled design will make this an amazing tent in Winter. But what about Summer? The venting system to make this a true 4-Season tent, and not just a Winter Tent, is quite remarkable and innovative.

Vents have been installed at both ends of the tent, but more than that, struts have been installed into the fly to allow for the vents to be held open, increasing airflow. Awesome!

Inside the tent there are pockets where you’d need them. A pocket on each side of the tent down low for a phone or wallet and overhead pockets for a headlamp. If you turn your headlamp on and place it in the overhead pocket it diffuses light around the tent.

Space is at a premium inside the tent, but this is understandable as it’s meant as a mountaineering tent which will need to fit onto small ledges or will need to have a level platform chopped out of the snow and ice for it. A bigger footprint is not better up high in the mountains. Still, there is space at the foot of the tent for extra clothes and other essentials.

The vestibule is roomy enough to store backpacks and sharp objects like ice axes as well as your hiking boots.

Overall I was impressed with the Kunai 2P Mountaineering tent. The burly design inspires confidence when heading out in even the gnarliest of conditions. The attention to detail is truly incredible and the weight of 2.1kgs (4lbs 10oz) won’t weigh me down either.

The cinch for holding the front door open.

The cinch for holding the front door open.

Pros:

  • Light Weight – For a full featured, double walled tent that has been reinforced for use in Winter the trail weight of 2.1kgs is amazing!
  • Pitches Fast – Very efficient pitching system. Everything clicks into place quickly and the tent tensions nicely.
  • Ventilation – Venting is second to none. Whatever the weather I’d feel confident I could keep the temperature comfortable inside this tent.
Nemo Kunai 2P Tent

A sight for sore eyes, seeing our tent pitched during a hike near our campsite.

Cons:

  • Pegs – The pegs are not the burliest. I didn’t feel confident hammering them into the ground. They need to be used in areas where they can be pushed into the ground without exerting too much force. Admittedly, as it’s a 4-season tent you will likely be using this tent a lot in Winter and using snow stakes instead of the included pegs.
Night falls on the Kunai 2P Tent

Night falls on the Kunai 2P Tent

Buy it if:

You are looking for a true all year, 12 month, 4 season tent for camping out on Glaciers in a hurricane to doing a multi-day backpack through forests and coastlines in Summer.

Tent Pitched, water boiling, time to watch the sun set.

Tent Pitched, water boiling, time to watch the sun set.

Stats:

  • Trail Weight: 2.1kg / 4lbs 10oz
  • Floor Dimensions: 85 in x 51 (footwidth) 42 in / 216 cm x 130 (footwidth) 107 cm
  • Floor Area: 27 sq ft / 2.5 sq m
  • Color: Skyburst Orange

More Info:

Website: Nemo Kunai 2P Mountaineering Tent

Nemo Kunai 2P Tent

The pleasing glow from the Kunai 2P Mountaineering Tent

More Pictures!

The Kunai 2P tent at Watersprite Lake

The Kunai 2P tent at Watersprite Lake

Reinforcement in the fly where the brow pole presses against it.

Reinforcement in the fly where the brow pole presses against it.

The stakes/pegs provided with the Kunai 2P Tent.

The stakes/pegs provided with the Kunai 2P Tent.

Author: Leigh McClurg

I grew up in County Dublin, Ireland and moved to British Columbia, Canada with my wife in 2010. I fell in love with being in the Backcountry and Mountains that are all around me here and try to spend all of my free time exploring those wild places. My main goals are to chase happiness, see as much of this planet and its cultures as possible and grow every day through knowledge and experiences.

Share This Post On

17 Comments

  1. Great review. Its that time of year when a four season starts making sense. I like your comment about the darned stuff sacks! You spent $700 on a tent and they put it in a $1 bag. I’m glad they didn’t cut any corners on this bad boy!

    Post a Reply
  2. Great review! My one concern is the weight of the tent vs high winds. Based on your usage so far, have you experienced high winds yet? Or is it even a concern based on overall construction? In the off chance that I get caught in nasty weather, I don’t want to regret investing in a tried and true model.

    Post a Reply
    • Hi Cameron,

      I think in high winds using the extra guy lines would be an absolute must. There are guy out points on the fly but Nemo has also smartly added guy lines to the main body also that pass through the fly so they can be tensioned.

      You can see the orange guy lines spooled up in this image:
      http://i1.wp.com/pebbleshoo.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/P9120965.jpg

      There are flaps in the fly that these lines can pass through.

      In high winds I’d recommend always using these.

      Post a Reply
  3. I think this tent is discontinued some time ago.

    Post a Reply
  4. Hi, I’m considering the Nemo Kunai as my first tent purchase. Since reviewing it, do you have any more insight on how it performs in summer heat/ventilation wise?
    Most of my backpacking will be done in fall/winter, but I’d really like something that doesn’t bake me when I do hike in summer.

    Post a Reply
    • It works really well in summer. If you know it isn’t going to rain you can leave the fly off also. I’ve used it in warm temperatures but mainly with a light breeze always blowing. The ability to hold the ventilation ports open with the struts to allow air to flow through the tent and exchange the air is awesome.

      Post a Reply
  5. Thanks for the review. Have you used it in high winds yet? I’m looking for a solid tent for the desert in winter, where high winds are a factor. Thanks again.

    Post a Reply
    • Hey Jeff,

      If you check out my answer to Cameron above I answered this question. My reply was:

      “I think in high winds using the extra guy lines would be an absolute must. There are guy out points on the fly but Nemo has also smartly added guy lines to the main body also that pass through the fly so they can be tensioned.

      You can see the orange guy lines spooled up in this image:

      http://i1.wp.com/pebbleshoo.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/P9120965.jpg

      There are flaps in the fly that these lines can pass through. In high winds I’d recommend always using these.”

      Post a Reply
  6. How well does it repell rain and avoid condensation? Does it stay dry inside during a downpour?

    Post a Reply
    • Really well. I’ve never noticed moisture getting inside. The double wall design and ventilating mesh also helps stop the build up of condensation.

      Post a Reply
  7. Thank you for this review!
    I appreciatedall the pictures and the thoroughness of it. May I ask three questions? Would you recommend this tent, do you think it’s worth the money, and do you think it’s durable enough to last a long time?

    Post a Reply
    • Definitely, I would recommend this tent. For what you get, a true 4-season tent, not just a winter tent that has condensation issues in the summer, yes, it’s great value for money.

      For durability, I would recommend also getting the footprint for this tent to protect the base. Other than that, yes, I think this tent, properly cared for, will last a lifetime of camping.

      Post a Reply
  8. Hey, great review. I totally agree about the pegs. I just got this tent and have yet to find a truly streamlined method to fold it back into the case in the most compact way possible. Any suggestions?

    Post a Reply
  9. I got mine last fall and I absolutely love it. It’s very sturdy, warm on the inside, and the ventilation works great, which allows the Kunai 2P to truly function as a 4-season tent. It’s also lightweight enough to serve quite well as a backpacking tent. My only complaint might be that after attaching the brow pole, the sides of the floor will try to lift up, though this doesn’t reply matter when you are sleeping in it. Other than that, I think that this is an excellent 4-season/backpacking tent.

    Post a Reply
  10. Great review, thanks! Considering to buy this tent.. One question: is the vestibule large enough? Do you find it has enough space to prepare food when it’s raining outside? Can you store 2 backpacks and 2 pair of hiking shoes?

    Post a Reply
    • Hmm… I’d have to say no. It’s not a huge vestibule. The tent has definitely been tailored more towards interior space and external. In summer I use the vestibule for only boots and my stove.

      However, when snow camping, I will hollow out the vestibule (dig down about 2ft in the shape of the vestibule) to make a seat in the doorway. Doing it this way I create enough space to store packs, boots and create a small kitchen area for boiling water.

      Honestly, I never use a vestibule for boiling water. If the weather is that bad I will plan to hang my stove in the tent and keep it well ventilated to account for CO build up. It’s never a concern for me as my stove will usually boil water in 2 minutes.

      You can see my setup here: http://pebbleshoo.com/msr-reactor-hanging-kit-thoughts-on-stoves-in-tents/

      Post a Reply

Leave a Reply

Do you know someone who would be interested in this?

%d bloggers like this:

Send this to a friend